Stay where you are?

STAY WHERE YOU ARE?

I have been leading prayer meetings. And preaching on a Sunday. And writing blog posts.
Art will soon be ‘SPRING-ing’ up again.
When I sort out my work shed (studio)

Meantime…

I would like the inhabitants of the world to do exactly what I tell them.
But I am not a betting man.
So I won’t bet on it coming to pass.

I was thinking about the many thought processes people engage in. Whether it’s some mathematical equation – or learning of a medical kind, or maybe re-reading your scientific notes on the ‘origin of the species’.

Think of the intellectual horns that are often locked in many different fields, as view opposes view. Opinion versus opinion.

A ruler named Festus said with a loud voice, “Paul, you are beside yourself! Much learning is driving you mad!” (speaking as he was to Paul the apostle).

To the average intellect – it is plain to be seen that this Ruler – was somewhat disturbed from his comfort zone, as Paul the apostle presented a message to his ears, and to those close by.

Festus was in a certain place intellectually – and cemented into his own way of going, his own way of living. Set in his ways, as we say – and feeling uncomfortable – he grasped for a response from his own reference data, filed away under the heading of *’my personal philosophy about life’.

Everybody has one of *those, so it is not hard to conclude that he was no exception.

A file containing the things we have established consciously and unconsciously that determines our lifestyle, goals, aspirations, outlook on a myriad of subjects, and – as we think in our hearts – so we are.

Enter Paul – disturber of our certitudes shaker of our mattress and bedclothes – turning-over our bed and throwing us onto the floor of his gospel.

React, react, react. Only way to handle this intruder – who has come to turn our world upside down. This would demand a change in us (were we to entertain it) – therefore ‘much learning does make him mad’, is the most comfortable response. Warding off his intrusion, and the intrusion of Christ.

‘I will stay where I am thank you very much’ – tucked up in the comfort of a bed of half-truths.

Then King (Herod-) Agrippa II, the other man in authority – responded: “You almost persuade me to become a Christian.”

And Paul said, “I would to God that not only you, but also all who hear me today, might become both almost and altogether such as I am…”

Acts 26.

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